Conference Schedule – Saturday, April 9

7:00 AM  Check-In table opens:  Pick up registration materials at the check-in table

7:30 – 9:00 AM  Continental Breakfast in the Lehigh Room

Please Note:  Agent/Editor appointments will occur throughout the day in the Foundry. Please check your registration materials for the appointment timeslot assigned to you.

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8:00 – 9:40 AM    (Concurrent Sessions)

In the Cedar Crest Room:

Shawn Smucker Photo2 (2)  

Shawn Smucker 

The Ghost in the Room is You: Mastering Co-Writing and Ghost-Writing

As publishers continue to turn to more and more high-profile stories in order to sell books, they become increasingly dependent on co-writers and ghost-writers to help tell these stories. As independent publishing becomes more accessible, an increasing number of individuals would like to preserve their stories in book form. In this session, Shawn will share how he got into ghost-writing and co-writing, and what it takes to write someone else’s story well.

In the Muhlenberg Room:

Agent/Editor Panel

Moderated by Kathy McAuley

Kathy McAuley Agents will share insights, guidelines, and ideas for writers. These agents will also meet with participants to hear pre-scheduled pitches throughout the day.

In the Lafayette Room:

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Robert Liparulo 

“Writing a Series” 

Readers and publisher love novel series. Readers get more of the stories and characters they enjoy, and publishers have found that their marketing budgets stretch further on multiple books with the same characters or storylines. For writers too, series have their benefits, such as already intimately knowing their recurring characters and often getting to use research that wouldn’t fit in a single story. Some series are planned—a big story that obviously needs more than one book to tell, or a character that’s just too darned cool to limit to one book. Others develop from the success of a standalone story—readers scream for more, and of course you (and your publisher) are more than happy to oblige. Robert Liparulo’s three series of novels (the John Hutchinson books, The Immortal Files, and the Dreamhouse Kings) were birthed both ways. Here, he’ll discuss the in’s and out’s of novel series, how to develop them and keep readers interested through multiple stories, and how to pitch them to publishers.

In the Moravian Room:

Mary Shafer Bio II

Mary Shafer 

“Researching and Writing Historical Fiction and Nonfiction”

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9:50 – 10:40 AM    (Concurrent Sessions)

In the Cedar Crest Room:

Ramona Long

Ramona DeFelice Long

“Creative Non-Fiction”

This workshop will examine how basic storytelling skills can be used to turn real events and experiences into essays and articles that both inspire and inform. You will learn how to use reporting and research skills to provide the backbone for creative nonfiction, as well as understanding how to craft a personal essay. We will address the questions of what is creative nonfiction? What are the long and short forms of creative nonfiction? How is CNF different or similar to memoir? What kinds of subjects work well for CNF? How creative can a writer be when telling a fact-based story? How personal can a personal essay get? and, what are the markets for CNF? You will leave this session with a comprehensive understanding of how to use reporting and research skills to provide the backbone for creative nonfiction, as well as be able to understand how to craft a personal essay. 

In the Muhlenberg Room:

Suzy-Q-2013 Compress

Suzy Kuhn
  “Book Promotion Basics”  

Suzanne will help you answer the all important questions of So What? Who Cares? and Why You? Answering these three questions will help you identify who will read your book, an immediate plan of action, and action steps to carry out your promotion plan long term.

In the Lafayette Room:

Mary Shafer Bio II

Mary Shafer 

“Researching and Writing Historical Fiction and Nonfiction”

In the Moravian Room:

Kelly simmons pix 2

Kelly Simmons
“ How to Find Time to Organize Your Writing – Even When Life Gets Crazy”

Everybody’s busy.  And when a job, kids, illness, or unforeseen obstacles get in the way of your writing, you need to have some strategies and tools ready. In this session, you will find out:

1. How your personality and environment affects your writing

2. The role of organization and prioritization 

3. Creating writing rituals and habit/reward structures

4. Tips for finding time pockets 

5. Tools and techniques to fight distractions and disruptions

 

In the Allentown Room (Special Break Out Seminar):

Hana

Hana Haatainen Caye
“Fictional Characters Anonymous”  

“Hi. My name is Doris, and I’m a fictional character.” During this workshop, all participants will introduce themselves as one of their characters from their WIP and will remain in character throughout the session. Consider this a support group meeting for characters to work out some of their issues. The results of the meeting are often surprising, as you discover character nuances, vulnerability, and trigger points. In order to write enticing fiction, you have to know your characters intimately. FCA can help you do just that! All participants will be expected to take part in the discussions.    

Limited to 12 participants.

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Break at 10:40 – 11:00 AM

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11:00 – 11:50 AM    (Concurrent Sessions)

In the Cedar Crest Room:

Hana

Hana Haatainen Caye
“The Business of Writing – Ways to make money as a freelance writer” 



Running a freelance writing business can be more profitable than you may think. In this workshop we’ll cover the various types of business and creative writing opportunities that exist for writers who see beyond their fiction and poetry and want to find a way to make a living, or simply earn some extra cash, through the written word. Examples will include: press releases, advertising copy, magazine articles, on hold message scripts, sales letters, webpage writing, search engine optimized writing, newsletters, and more.

In the Muhlenberg Room:

Ramona Long
Ramona DeFelice Long
“The Writing Hour”  


Having trouble carving out writing time? This workshop gives tips and skills for making a dedicated daily writing hour part of your life. Topics include: determining your most creative time of day, making the only available hour work, determining the most practical time of day for you to write, how to develop a regular, one-hour-a-day writing practice, the benefits of single tasking/no distractions writing, how to warm up for a writing hour, writing in sprints, the writing hour community, using a writing hour journal to plan your writing time, and other tasks (revising, outlining, blogging) when not creating new words. You will leave this session with a comprehensive understanding of how to create a habit of writing for a set time in a set place, every day or as best fits your life, as well as the benefits of single tasking while being creative.

In the Lafayette Room:

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Catherine McLean
“View, Verbs, and Vividness—A Different Way to Look at Show-Don’t-Tell”  

Want to stop telling and do more showing with your writing? Learn how to employ Point of View and Viewpoint for effect, why action-packed verbs are a must, and how to add vividness with image-provoking words that make for page-turning reads.

In the Moravian Room:

John Gibbs pix - Copy

Jon Gibbs
“The Three Cs of Conflict”

When it comes to fiction, the right type of conflict makes the difference between a great read and a dull one, but what is the right type of conflict? How do you create it? When (and where) should you apply it? And can you ever have too much?

A fun, informative, presentation on how to create all the story conflict you need to keep those readers turning the pages.

Also, there may be candy.

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Lunch and Keynote Speaker – Robert Liparulo

12:00 – 1:30 PM

*****

1:40 – 2:30 PM    (Concurrent Sessions)

In the Cedar Crest Room:

Shawn Smucker Photo2 (2)

Shawn Smucker

“Telling the Truth: Writing Memoirs and Finding Our Way

Memoirs have exploded in popularity in recent years, and the genre is constantly being redefined. In this session, Shawn will explore the current state of the memoir, what readers are really looking for, and the five most important things to keep in mind while writing your own story.

In the Muhlenberg Room:

SuzyQ

Suzy Kuhn
 “Using Social Media to Reach and Expand Your Audience”   

Suzanne will go behind the scenes to show you the secrets of crafting our social media so you reach your intended audiences. With so many ads, blurbs, and distractions within the social media realm, you need to learn how to funnel your audience’s attention and target the clients you need. The necessary tools are right at your fingertips. Join Suzanne and unlock the keys of effective social media.

In the Lafayette Room:

Catherine McClean 2

Catherine McLean
“Revision is a Process Simplified”   

Creating a story is the fun part of writing but revising that draft? Learn how to take the angst and frustration out of revising and rewriting by applying structured creativity that makes revision an easy, simplified process. 

In the Moravian Room:

Jon Gibbs pix 2

Jon Gibbs
 “13 Things to Think About When Writing for YA/Tweens”

There’s more to writing for the middle grade/young adult market than just making your characters the appropriate age. What level of vocabulary should you use? What interests YA/Tween readers today? Should you write in first person or third? Which (if any) topics or situations are considered off-limits by traditional publishers?

A fun, informative, presentation on what to keep in mind when writing for the YA/Tween market.

*****

2:40 – 3:30 PM    (Concurrent Sessions)

In the Cedar Crest Room:

Hana

Hana Haatainen Caye
 “From Blog To Book”   

A faithful following of readers in your blog community is the perfect scenario for book sales. They already love you and they’re eager for more. A blog can work to your advantage when you’re planning on releasing a novel or intend to write a non-fiction book based on the posts you’ve already researched and written. This workshop will focus on how to best use your blog to prep your readership, as well as how to transform blog posts into a book.

In the Muhlenberg Room:

Jon Gibbs pix 2

Jon Gibbs

Say it again, Sam – Making the Most of Dialogue”  

When it comes to fiction, what characters say, how they say it, and what they don’t say when they’re saying it, makes the difference between a dull read and a page-turner. Great dialogue pulls the reader into the story, it makes them care about the characters inside. So how can we use it most effectively, and what common mistakes should we try to avoid?

Also, there may be candy.

1: Using dialogue to show personality/character.

2: Using dialogue to pull the reader into the story.

3: Using dialogue to move the story along.

4: Using dialogue to make readers relate/empathize with characters.

5: Realistic dialogue vs grammatically correct (and onomatopoeic).

6: Dialogue no-nos eg: backstory, info dumps, and the dreaded As you know Bob…

7: Speech tags – The good, the bad, and the unnecessary

 

In the Lafayette Room:

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Robert Liparulo
“Working with Hollywood” 

It’s (almost) every author’s dream to have his or her novel made into a movie—after all, it’s free (and huge) marketing for a book and the author, not to mention the big bucks of the licensing deal itself. But it’s a long, treacherous road from published book (or unpublished manuscript) to theater screen. The more you know about the process—working with movie-rights agents, pitching producers, dealing with screenwriters—the less treacherous that road becomes. Robert Liparulo has sold or optioned the movie rights to nine of his novels, co-wrote the screenplay of Ted Dekker’s “Blessed Child,” which sold to a major producer, and co-wrote (with Andy Davis, director of “The Fugitive” and “Holes”) an original thriller screenplay for Phoenix Pictures. In this 50-minute session, he’ll spill the beans on his experience navigating the Hollywood literary backlots.

In the Moravian Room:

Kelly simmons pix 2

Kelly Simmons

“Crafting Killer Query Letters”

The only thing that stands between you and a great agent or publisher isn’t a great novel.  It’s a great letter.  You will learn proven advertising techniques to help you craft a query that breaks through.  If you have a query in progress and are willing to share it, bring it in for class evaluation.

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Then join us in the Lehigh Room at 3:30 Pm for the author’s Book Fair.

Book Fair 2

Flash contest winners and Door Prizes will be announced in the Muhlenburg Room.

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Hotel Room Map:

Best Western Floor Map JPEG